In a world where information is bit-sized and smartphones are the key to knowledge, the concept of microlearning fits right in.

 

Microlearning allows employees to learn by watching and interacting with short pieces of information on mobile devices at their convenience. And it can make all the difference in your learning and development program, whether you’re helping employees earn their degrees or they’re building on existing knowledge.

 

Employee education is clearly important to many employers.

 

“According to the 2016 Employee Benefits survey report from the Society for Human Resource Management, 55 percent of organizations offered education assistance for undergraduate programs, 52 percent offered education assistance for post-graduate programs and 4 percent of companies offered employees help with student loan repayments, writes Greg Wright for the Society for Human Resource Management.

 

Microlearning allows education to be more accessible — and therefore more achievable — for many employees.

 

“There has always been the capability to create video learning materials, but most of it is too long or drawn out for learners to get any long-term value from this medium,” writes Tess Taylor for HR Dive.

 

That will change as microlearning highlights videos ranging from 120 seconds to less than a minute.

 

“The research (shows) learners can better absorb learning when it’s delivered in small bits at a time,” Taylor writes.

 

Such opportunities may appeal more to certain demographics of employees.

 

“Millennials value training and development benefits above all,” Taylor writes, citing the Bersin by Deloitte Future of Corporate Learning report. “The survey showed that 22 percent of Millennials desired learning benefits, as compared to 19 percent wanting flexible work schedules and 14 percent wanting cash bonuses. It’s clear that in 2017, this trend will continue as more Millennials enter the workforce seeking training opportunities that they can leverage to climb the corporate ladder.”

 

They also love their devices, which makes microlearning even more perfect, writes Adela Belin for Your Training Edge.

 

“Use the idea of microlearning to tap the audiences who love mobile,” she writes. “Through micro-learning, you can deliver bite-size content to the learners when they need it.”

 

Microlearning can also work well for employees who are too busy to earn a traditional education. They can learn on their phones while waiting to drive their kids’ carpool or sitting on the bus on the way to work.

 

“Flexible degree programs can make it possible for employees to earn a college degree by taking online courses on a mobile device,” Wright writes.